Applied twice in a growing season to row crops, propane flame weeding is up to 90% effective against weeds.

Efficient, effective and 100% organic

Flame weeding is perfect for organic farmers who can’t use traditional herbicides, or any producer who want to reduce their herbicide use. It works by using intense heat to rupture plant cells, causing the weed to wither and die. Flame weed control can be used in a variety of weather conditions and growth stages, and it allows farmers to return to the field immediately after treatment.

How propane flame weed control works

During flame weeding, propane-powered burners expose weed plant tissues to high levels of heat that rapidly change the internal temperature of plant cells and cause plant cells to rupture. The resulting loss of water and denaturing of proteins drastically reduces the weed’s ability to survive, which then kills the plant.

Propane flame weed control is environmentally friendly, equally as effective as herbicides

Propane-powered flame weed control is growing in popularity because it is an environmentally friendly alternative to herbicides that is equally effective. It is a great weed control solution for the growing number of organic farmers, as well as an alternative for others interested in reducing herbicide use, or tackling herbicide resistant weeds.

Propane flame weeding easily fits into your crop production schedule

Flame weed control can be used in a variety of weather conditions and growth stages, and it allows farmers to return to the field immediately after treatment. Propane flame weeding can easily fit into any crop production schedule.

Contact your local propane supplier

Your local propane suppliers do more than sell and deliver fuel. Whether you need propane for your home or business, Suburban Propane can help you assess your energy needs, install tanks and refueling infrastructure, and service your propane system for years to come.

Click here for more information and to find a customer service center near you, or call 1-800-PROPANE.

 

Courtesy of Propane Education & Research Council